February 2020

‘Rarest’ ape’s path to survival blocked by roads, dams and agriculture

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored According to a new study, the Tapanuli orangutan, one of only seven species of non-human great ape alive today, faces serious threats to its survival as infrastructure development and agriculture threaten more than one-quarter of its habitat.In November, a team of scientists reported that a new species of orangutan living on the Indonesian island of Sumatra was distinct from Sumatran and Bornean orangutans.They believe that fewer than 800 Tapanuli orangutans survive.Conservationists and scientists warn that a proposed 510-megawatt hydroelectric dam could push the new species closer to extinction. Even as scientists introduced the world to a new species of orangutan in 2017 — one of only seven non-human great apes alive today — they were already working to pinpoint the threats that might lead to its demise.In a new study published today in the journal Current Biology, a team of scientists reports that road expansion, agricultural conversion and a planned hydropower project could destroy more than one-quarter of the Tapanuli orangutan’s existing habitat. With no more than 800 individuals, the world’s rarest ape species could face extinction not long after we became aware of its existence.“In forty years of research, I don’t think I’ve ever seen anything this dramatic,” said William Laurance, a tropical ecologist at James Cook University in Australia and the team’s leader, in a statement.A male Tapanuli orangutan in the Batang Toru forest. Image by Tim Laman via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY 4.0).In November, a different group of researchers concluded that orangutans living in the Batang Toru region should be considered a new species, Pongo tapanuliensis. Based on the differences in their behavior, genetics and morphology, the Tapanuli orangutan is distinct from its cousins living in the rainforests of Borneo (Pongo pygmaeus) and elsewhere in Sumatra (Pongo abelii), they argued.Around the same time, Laurance and his colleagues had created detailed maps of the road network across northern Sumatra, including the forests of Batang Toru, part of a broader effort to map both infrastructure projects and targets for conservation across Southeast Asia. They decided to use those analyses to explore the impact the existing — and future — infrastructure developments might have on the Tapanuli orangutan.“It just seemed like an obvious thing to do,” Laurance told Mongabay.The estimated range of Pongo tapanuliensis in northern Sumatra, Indonesia, with the region’s legal forest-use designations and non-forest land covers. Image courtesy of Sloan et al., 2018.They found that planned developments pose a serious threat to this species’ survival, not to mention that of other animals such as the critically endangered Sumatran tiger (Panthera tigrissumatrae).The forests that are home to the Tapanuli orangutan are split into eastern and western “blocks,” along with the Lubuk Raya reserve, creating three isolated populations. What’s more, about 5 percent of the remaining numbers live in the Dolok Sibual Buali reserve, linked to the western block by a sliver of forest only about 700 meters (2,300 feet) wide.This corridor, as well as a sizeable chunk of the eastern block of habitat, have been zoned for oil palm and other types of agriculture, putting around 14 percent of the species’ total habitat in danger of development. Splitting the already-disjointed orangutan populations into smaller and smaller pieces will increase the chances of problems like inbreeding and accelerate the species’ slide toward extinction, the authors write.But the most pressing threat looming over these orangutans is a proposed 510-megawatt hydroelectric dam.“It’s right in the core habitat,” Laurance said.Land cleared as a staging area for the building of a new hydroelectric dam. Image courtesy of Sumatran Orangutan Conservation Programme.Based on the team’s analyses, they figure the project would dramatically change 96 square kilometers (37 square miles), or about 8 percent, of the animal’s range in the next four years. The dam’s construction would inevitably carry with it a suite of ancillary impacts, such as the access roads that crews will build and the pathways for power lines that they’ll have to carve through the forest. Such openings into the forest increase the odds that farmers will clear more land for agriculture or hunters will enter the area.Conversely, restoring forest at the proposed site of the dam would create a few narrow corridors that could reconnect the eastern and western populations and boost the species’ chances of survival, Laurance said.Despite these concerns, the project continues to move forward. Laurance said that he received confirmation that the World Bank has decided not to help fund the $1.6-billion project, likely because of the potential environmental damage. But the Bank of China has pledged financing for the dam, and a Chinese-state-owned hydroelectric company called Sinohydro has signed on to handle its construction.“It’s only about 510 megawatts. That’s not that much,” said Serge Wich, a primatologist at England’s Liverpool John Moores University, in an interview. “There are alternatives to get that energy.”Bornean (left), Sumatran (middle) and Tapanuli (right) male orangutans. Image by Eric Kilby, Aiwok and Tim Laman via Wikimedia Commons (GFDL).Wich was not involved in this research, but he was a coauthor of the paper announcing the new orangutan species in November.“There is so little time to protect this species,” he said. “The main value in this paper for us is that we can use it to further indicate what the main threats are and that there are still parts of their habitat need to be protected.”He urged the dam’s developers and representatives of the Indonesian government “to have a sensible discussion” about alternatives for generating power in this part of Sumatra. In the same vein, a growing cadre of scientists and conservation organizations, led by groups like the Sumatran Orangutan Conservation Programme and the Sumatran Orangutan Society, are campaigning for a change in the project’s course.But if that doesn’t happen, the dam would be “the beginning of the end of this species,” Wich said.He said that little beyond the “extreme conservation” approached used in shepherding Africa’s mountain gorillas (Gorilla beringei beringei) back from the brink of extinction, such as near-round-the-clock surveillance by armed guards, will keep the Tapanuli orangutan from disappearing forever.An adult female Tapanuli orangutan. Image by Tim Laman via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY 4.0).“Personally, I think it would be an enormous tragedy if we would lose a species for 510 megawatts,” he added. “That sounds absurd to me, but that seems [to be] where it’s heading if the government and company are not willing to change their path.”Laurance and his colleagues agree, arguing in the paper that the government should protect every bit of the animal’s remaining habitat without hesitation.“It’s not going to take a huge push to actually drive something like this to extinction,” he said. “It is absolutely time to pull out all the stops.”Banner image of an adult female Tapanuli orangutan by Tim Laman via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY 4.0). John Cannon is a staff writer at Mongabay. Find him on Twitter:@johnccannonCITATIONSNater, A., Mattle-Greminger, M. P., Nurcahyo, A., Nowak, M. G., de Manuel, M., Desai, T., … & Lameira, A. R. (2017). Morphometric, behavioral, and genomic evidence for a new Orangutan species. Current Biology, 27(22), 3487-3498.Sloan, S., Supriatna, J., Campbell, M. J., Alamgir, M., & Laurance, W. F. (2018). Newly discovered orangutan species requires urgent habitat protection. Current Biology, 28:R1-R3.Editor’s note: William Laurance is a member of Mongabay’s advisory board. Article published by John Cannoncenter_img Agriculture, Animals, Apes, Biodiversity, Conservation, Critically Endangered Species, Dams, Deforestation, Development, Ecology, Endangered Species, Environment, Extinction, Featured, Forests, Great Apes, Habitat Degradation, Habitat Destruction, Habitat Loss, Hunting, Infrastructure, Mammals, Oil Palm, Orangutans, Over-hunting, Palm Oil, Poaching, Primates, Protected Areas, Rainforests, Research, Roads, Sustainable Development, Tigers, Tropical Forests, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation, Wildlife Trade last_img read more

Latam Eco Review: Deforestation encircles Colombia’s Caquetá titi monkey

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Conservation, Environment, Indigenous Peoples, Infrastructure, Oil Spills, Tropical Forests, Wildlife Article published by Maria Salazarcenter_img Below are summaries of the most popular stories by our Spanish language service, Mongabay Latam, from the week of May 21-27. Among the top articles: deforestation is clearing the tiny habitat of Colombia’s Caquetá titi monkey. In other news, a court gives Peru’s health ministry 30 days for an emergency health plan for communities affected by oil spills in the Amazon. Also, real-time monitoring integrates images and sounds of the Amazon.Colombia: Deforestation clears tiny habitat of Caquetá titi monkeyThe IUCN declared the beautiful Caquetá monkey Critically Endangered soon after its discovery. Image courtesy of Javier Garcia, National Legacy Foundation.The Caquetá titi monkey was declared Critically Endangered not only because it is endemic to a small part of the Amazonian plateau, but also because it inhabits a province that has lost more than 200,000 hectares of forest, an area the size of Luxeumbourg, in the last ten years.Peru: Court orders emergency health strategy for Amazon communities affected by oil spillsLoreto’s supreme court ordered the health ministry to establish an emergency health plan for the 30 communities affected by the 2014 oil spill. Image by Silviu Dimiutrache/Chaikuni InstituteAfter years of legal battle, the supreme court of Loreto gave the health ministry 30 days to come up with an emergency health plan for Amazon indigenous communities affected by a 2014 oil spill. A document obtained by Mongabay showed the ministry had not complied with a previous court order for specialized services.Ecuador: Waoranis take a ‘toxic tour’ to understand the impacts of oilThe Waoranis took a ‘toxic tour’ led by indigenous communities of Sucumbios besieged by oil extraction to learn about the impact of the pollution on other communities in the Amazon. Image courtesy of Daniel Aguilar.“The land is dead,” was the sentence from a resident of virgin rainforest perplexed by the devastation left by the petroleum industry in Pacayacu, in the northern Amazon of Ecuador. The Waoranis of Pastaza took a ‘toxic tour’ ahead of a possible oil concession on their territory.Mexico: Sonora gas line divides Yaqui communities and unleashes a wave of violenceTwo dead, more than ten wounded, 11 vehicles burned and a pipeline pulled out of the ground is the toll of a confrontation between indigenous communities over the construction of the Sonora pipeline in northern Mexico. Image courtesy of Canal Sonora Mexico.Eighteen kilometers of the 330-km Guayamas-El Oro gas pipeline will cross the territory of the Yaqui indigenous community of Loma de Bácum, and it’s the first branch that is responsible for Yaquis fighting among themselves. The most visible remains of the latest violent episode are still seen in Loma de Bácum town center.Peru’s Environmental Minister: “We will not permit environmental impunity.”Peru’s President Martín Vizcarra and the new environmental ministry Fabiola Muñoz. Image courtesy of Andina.Eight ministries are collaborating on the issue of illegal mining, particularly to stop the use of mercury, human trafficking and child labor, revealed Environment Minister Fabiola Muñoz in an interview with Mongabay.Providence Project: Real-time monitoring integrates images and sounds of the AmazonThe Providence Project analyzes in real time images and sounds of Amazonian biodiversity. Image courtesy of Providence Project.When the researchers Emiliano Esterci and Michel André met three years ago, they didn’t imagine that they were going revolutionize how to observe biodiversity in the Amazon. Both had experience in species monitoring technology: Esterci in images and André with sound. From these scientific conversations arose the Providence Project, a real-time monitoring system of the Amazon landscape that integrates sound and video. The project seeks to monitor a protected area in real time for the first time.Read these stories in Spanish here.last_img read more

In other news: Environmental stories from around the web, August 24, 2018

first_imgArticle published by John Cannon There are many important conservation and environmental stories Mongabay isn’t able to cover.Here’s a digest of some of the significant developments from the week.If you think we’ve missed something, feel free to add it in the comments. Tropical forestsCentral African countries embark on an effort for more sustainable architecture (CIFOR Forests News).Community land rights get a boost in Ethiopia with a new forestry law (CIFOR Forests News).Authorities in Malaysia have confiscated a haul of rhino horns worth $12 million (Reuters).A new sanctuary in Malaysia will protect tigers and other wildlife, according to the Rainforest Trust (The Rainforest Trust).A planned dam in Tanzania could impinge on a vital wildlife sanctuary (BirdLife International).Other newsTrees in temperate forests are taller but less dense than they were 100 years ago due to climate change (Science Magazine).New research tracks changes in global fishing trends going back 150 years (Hakai Magazine).Monsanto’s use of the potentially carcinogenic compound glyphosate, a weed killer, leads to some 8,000 lawsuits (Reuters).A recent study looks at how beehive fences can protect crops in Tanzania (Earth Touch News).Namibia’s desert lion faces threats to its survival as a species (The Guardian).“Environmental terrorist groups” responsible for wildfires in California, says Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke (The New York Times).The Trump administration says that conserving the use of oil isn’t required for economic reasons anymore (The Guardian).Wildlife managers in Ethiopia are using goat meat bait balls to deliver rabies vaccine to the country’s endangered wolves (The Guardian).More than 100 sea turtles died recently in a Mexican sanctuary, and government officials are trying to figure out why (Reuters).Scientists sound the alarm for pangolins, arguing that the heavily traded animal needs better protection in China (BBC News).More than two dozen manatees have died in Mexican wetlands since May (Reuters).Scientists follow the movements of basking sharks using satellites (The Hindu).Tens of thousands of giraffe parts have entered the U.S. in the past three decades, the Humane Society says (The Guardian).A fish found in South Africa that’s been around since the dinosaurs could face extinction with new oil drilling (The Guardian).Trump’s environmental regulation rollbacks face tough tests in court, with three going down this week (The Washington Post).An algal red tide has killed manatees in Florida this year (The Guardian).Contact lenses contribute to the microplastic pollution problem when they’re flushed down the toilet (The New York Times).How much of a problem is the bargain price for carbon emissions set by the Trump administration? (The New York Times).The EPA plans to allow states to set climate change controls on coal-fired power plants in the U.S. (Reuters).Despite earlier reports to the contrary, the use of the weedkiller glyphosate is still restricted in Brazil as an appeal is pending in the courts (Reuters).Banner image of a manatee by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Conservation, Environment, Weekly environmental news update center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Group helps illegal bird traders transition into different lines of business

first_imgInstead of focusing on putting bird poachers and illegal traders behind bars, an NGO in Indonesian Borneo is creating incentives for them to stop.It’s a unique approach in the Southeast Asian country, where conservation efforts have tended to focus on calls for tighter law enforcement and more rigorous punishment.The group, Planet Indonesia, has identified more than 100 small bird shops in and around Pontianak, the biggest city in western Borneo, and says many of them are pondering changing professions. It’s know-how and capital that’s holding them back. MOUNT NIUT, Indonesia — Catching tropical birds in the wild is relatively easy: you put glue on the branches of trees they inhabit. Some species can be lured closer with bird songs played back from a phone. Later, you peel off the birds whose wings or feet got stuck — an arduous procedure that leaves many of them injured, if not dead. Larger-scale operations use nets to catch many birds at once.Poachers in the few remaining forest ecosystems across Indonesia tend to catch indiscriminately, trapping everything they can get, from pangolins to hornbills, say wildlife trade experts. But lately, catching songbirds has become increasingly attractive because hobby birdkeepers are willing to pay handsomely for them.“The market is getting hot,” says Oktavianus Marko, a farmer from the slopes of Mount Niut in West Kalimantan province, one of the many remote forests in Indonesia that feed the growing demand for songbirds, especially on the island of Java, where songbird keeping is a tradition. Champion birds that win songbird competitions can cost as much as a car or house.Mount NiutMarko was once a trapper himself, but when he realized that some of the birds that were plentiful just a few years ago were starting to disappear, he decided to stop. It’s difficult to convince his friends to do the same, he told Mongabay. When other opportunities are lacking, poaching, or allowing other hunters to enter the forest in exchange for money, can be the only option they have left.Economic pressure and a lack of education are often the root causes of environmental loss. The global conservation community regularly encounters this pattern when studying factors that lead people to poach. Population growth has put humans and wildlife in competition for resources and space, and if a community sees no benefit in participating in conservation programs, or worse yet, is actually disadvantaged by them, these efforts are likely to fail.A growing understanding of these dynamics has led to a shift in mindset away from the so-called “fines and fences” approach that favors tightly guarded national parks and reserves, to more participatory programs based on community buy-in. The evaluation of some these programs suggest that they can produce long-lasting conservation successes.Planet Indonesia, an NGO that works in the Mount Niut area, is putting the participatory conservation principle to the test. Instead of focusing on putting poachers and traders behind bars, the group is creating incentives for them to stop — a unique approach in Indonesia, where conservation efforts have tended to focus on calls for tighter law enforcement and more rigorous punishment.Parts of Mount Niut are a nature reserve, which gives it a higher protection status than national parks in Indonesia. In theory, even entering the forest requires a permit, but local inhabitants, some of them ethnic Dayak who have lived off the forest for generations, find it hard to adjust to the rules.Conservation programs like Planet Indonesia’s, which are more prevalent in Africa and India, have to be incredibly diverse and tackle the problem of environmental loss from a number of angles, finding ways to engage with and steer away trappers and traders from environmentally harmful activities.Around Mount Niut, Planet Indonesia has a program that helps farmers like those in Marko’s village become more productive and profitable, for example by using homemade fertilizer and linking them up with new buyers for their crops. Healthier produce can be sold for more money, reducing the incentive to hunt animals in the forest.The NGO is also upgrading the way forest patrols are done. Official patrols in the nature reserve are rare. “There are only two units for an area of thousands of hectares,” Rodiansyah, who leads Planet Indonesia’s wildlife protection unit, told Mongabay.By involving the local residents in the patrols, larger areas can be covered, and there’s more transparency and trust in the process because the NGO has also introduced a standardized monitoring and reporting tool to archive what’s seen on each patrol. Community members who participate in the patrols are compensated for this work, a further incentive for them to disengage from poaching activities. Rodiansyah says they’ve seen the number of traps and nets go down since introducing the method.A forest patrol. Image courtesy of Planet Indonesia.One step further along the supply chain, Planet Indonesia works with traders and bird shop keepers in the area, hoping to help some of them transition into different lines of business.Unlike pangolin scales or hornbill beaks, which are trafficked across borders into Hong Kong, China and Taiwan on black market routes, much of the songbird trade happens out in the open. Many types of birds can be freely bought in shops and markets.Some of the birds most popular with hobbyists, like the white-rumped shama (Copsychus malabaricus) and the pied myna (Gracupica contra), are not recognized by Indonesia as protected species, despite a broad scientific consensus that their wild populations are in dangerous decline.Planet Indonesia has identified more than 100 small bird shops in and around Pontianak, the closest major city to the Niut reserve.Roughly 20 shopkeepers have been pondering changing professions, because they realize that selling birds, along with cages, crickets and dry food, isn’t such a great business anyway. Running a coffee shop or small convenience store would be more lucrative. What’s been holding them back is know-how and capital, says Juhar Diansyah, who manages the NGO’s division that assists bird shop keepers in their transition.One trader Mongabay interviewed in Pontianak said he principally agrees with efforts to protect endangered birds. And because it’s sometimes unclear to traders which birds are protected under Indonesian law and which aren’t, he fears he might unknowingly engage in illegal activities.Fifty-year-old Suparmin is a passionate birdkeeper who left his Javanese hometown to become a logger in West Kalimantan more than 30 years ago. He thinks he helped kick-start the songbird-keeping hobby in Pontianak, because he was one of the first to organize birdsong competitions there.Like Marko, Suparmin was once involved in the bird trade, but it dawned on him that things went too far when he saw large-scale traffickers shuttle birds off to faraway markets by the thousands. Many of the creatures don’t survive the journey.Suparmin. Image by Nadine Freischlad for Mongabay.Suparmin started assisting Planet Indonesia by gathering information and educating hobbyists and traders about the dangers of uncontrolled poaching. Before long, local law enforcement arrested a trader in Pontianak who was known to sell black-winged mynas (Acridotheres melanopterus), a critically endangered species that is on the government’s protected list.Some conservationists, like Marison Guciano from Flight, an NGO that monitors the bird trade, think stricter law enforcement is the best way to discourage people from trafficking birds. Marison has spent time embedded with trappers and knows how they work. He says birds captured in raids often have nowhere to go. The local authorities are ill-equipped to care for birds in the long term, especially if they are sick or injured. In Marison’s view, it’s better to release birds once they’ve been seized, rather than leaving them to suffer in captivity.Planet Indonesia isn’t opposed to law enforcement, but sees it as only one of many mechanisms to effectively combat the problem. The NGO places for emphasis on the need for rehabilitation and a long-term plan for eventual reintroduction to the wild.“If you release them without proper protection, they’ll just get captured again,” says Adam Miller, Planet Indonesia’s co-founder. “It feeds the cycle.”Tackling all points in the chain, from community supported monitoring and law enforcement, to education and income alternatives, has one goal: As many birds as possible are meant to be left where they are, the supply stopped at the source.Banner: A knobbed hornbill. Image by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by mongabayauthor Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Animals, Biodiversity, Birds, Conservation, Conservation And Poverty, Conservation Philosophy, Economics, Endangered, Environment, Forestry, Forests, Innovation In Conservation, Law Enforcement, Pet Trade, Poaching, Protected Areas, Rainforests, Tropical Forests, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation, Wildlife Trade, Wildlife Trafficking last_img read more

The hidden costs of hydro: We need to reconsider world’s dam plans

first_imgAmazon Conservation, Amazon Dams, Amazon Destruction, Amazon People, Climate Change and Dams, Controversial, Corruption, Dams, Deforestation, Drivers Of Deforestation, Energy, Energy Politics, Environment, Environmental Politics, Flooding, Forests, Green, Hydroelectric Power, Hydropower, Infrastructure, Land Use Change, Mekong Dams, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforests, Rivers, Saving The Amazon, Social Justice, Threats To The Amazon, Traditional People, Tropical Deforestation Article published by Glenn Scherer As thousands of hydroelectric dams are planned worldwide, including 147 in the Amazon, a new study finds that the true socio-environmental and cultural costs of dams are rarely evaluated before construction. Were such factors counted into the lifetime cost of the dams, many would not be built.Dam repairs and removal at the end of a project’s life are rarely figured into upfront costs. Nor are impacts on river flow reduction, loss of fisheries, and aquatic habitat connectivity, destruction of productive farmlands drowned by reservoirs, and the displacement of riverine peoples.Lack of transparency and corruption between government and dam construction companies is at the heart of the problem preventing change. Researchers recommend that environmental impact assessments (EIAs) and social impact assessments (SIAs) be granted enough weight so that if they turn out negatively it will prevent a bad dam from being built.EIAs and SIAs should be done by third parties serving citizens, not the dam company. Better governance surrounding dams needs to be organized and implemented. There needs to be increased transparency about the true financial, social, cultural and environmental costs of dams to the public. Maintaining river flows and fish migrations is also critical. The Belo Monte dam in the Brazilian Amazon. One of the biggest in the world, it was plagued by government and corporate corruption, did extensive socio-environmental damage, and has failed dramatically in producing promised amounts of electricity. Image courtesy of Wasserkraftwerk.An estimated 3,700 dams are either planned or under construction in developing countries around the world — including 147 slated for the Amazon basin region. At face value, dams seem like a good deal environmentally and socially. Invest heavily upfront and then tap into an ever-flowing, renewable power source.However, in a review paper, recently published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (PNAS), researchers argue that the true costs of hydropower projects are often underestimated, with harmful financial, social, and environmental consequences resulting in a wellspring of hidden costs.Worldwide, approximately 472 million people have been negatively affected by dam construction over the last century. Downstream, river-dependent communities may be displaced, be deprived of their food security and livelihoods, and suffer immeasurable cultural losses. Almost immediately after installation of the Tucuruí Dam in the Brazilian Amazon, for example, fish catch declined by 60 percent, while 100,000 downstream residents were impacted due to lost fisheries, flooded agricultural lands, or the loss of other resources.The PNAS review paper, produced by researchers at Michigan State University, investigates the socioeconomic and environmental impacts surrounding dams in several major river basins and makes recommendations for moving towards sustainable and responsible hydropower development in the 21st century.An indigenous protest against Amazon dams. Indigenous and traditional riverine peoples are among the most harmed by construction of the world’s dams. Image courtesy of Amazon Watch.Planning for the endIn North America and Europe, more dams are being torn down than constructed. In the U.S. alone, over 60 dams per year have been removed since 2006. Repairing a small dam can be more than three times more expensive than removing it, which is one of the reasons we are seeing a trend in dam removals.“The cost of removing a dam once it’s useful life is over is extremely high and should be taken into account when computing the total cost of a new hydro development. If the cost of removal had to be included, many dams wouldn’t be built,” said Emilio Moran, study lead author and principal investigator of research project supported by the São Paulo Research Foundation that was designed to study the socio-environmental consequences of the highly controversial Belo Monte hydropower mega-dam in the Brazilian Amazon.The lifespan of a dam is limited. Those currently being built in Brazil, for instance, are intended to last just 30 years. This may be extended by upgrades, but eventually, aging construction materials and sediment accumulation will cause a dam to deteriorate, stop functioning at a level that is economically viable to maintain, or — in worst case scenarios — to fail.A failed dam can result in tremendous loss of life and property. In 1976, the Teton Dam in Idaho, USA failed, resulting in eleven deaths and over $2 billion in damages. In 2018, 40 people were killed and 6,000 displaced by the collapse of the Xe-Pian Xe-Namnoy hydroelectric dam in the Mekong Valley of Laos, and though hundreds of people remain missing after that disaster, the construction of two large Mekong River dams is surging ahead as planned.The Teton dam in the U.S. as it began to collapse. As dams age and extreme weather events due to climate Image increase, more dam failures could occur. Image courtesy of WaterArchives.org licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 Generic license.Accounting for environmental harm Development, deforestation, and climate change can, and do, greatly influence a dam’s costs, productivity, and lifespan. Construction and deforestation increase the amount of sediment deposited into a river by orders of magnitude, shortening the life of a dam or requiring expensive intervention measures such as dredging.Also, up to half of the rain in the Amazon biome is created by means of internal moisture recycling (the forest making its own rain). Significant increases in deforestation disrupt the water cycle, decreasing precipitation and water availability to rivers. In addition, the decreases in river flow due to worsening drought can greatly reduce the amount of power generated by a dam, causing it to fall below original energy estimates — decreasing dam productivity and profits.Overall, the Amazon Basin is getting drier, decreasing the reliable water flow for its dams. As a result, climate change coupled with deforestation has helped cause the Belo Monte dam (completed in 2016) to produce, even in best case scenarios, only 4.46 of the 11.23 GW it was forecast to generate. The Jirau and Santo Antonio dams, also in the Amazon, are likewise projected to produce only a fraction of their originally projected 3 gigawatt (GW) capacities.At the famed Hoover Dam on the Colorado River in the U.S. West, water managers are preparing for predicted energy shortages due to climate change-escalated drought by placing new turbines at lower elevation — an expensive add on. Lake Mead, Hoover Dam’s reservoir, has seen a 40 percent decline in its water level, lowering electricity production by 25 percent.The Belo Monte mega-dam after completion. Image by Zoe Sullivan / Mongabay.Corruption / bad deals for citizensLarge dams are often promoted to the public as an opportunity to boost the local economy through jobs, increased infrastructure and access to power. But this is not always the case. In the Brazilian Amazon, the Belo Monte, Santo Antonio, and Jirau hydropower projects caused local electricity prices to go up rather than down.Promised jobs were given to non-locals and most of those disappeared within 5 years. In the case of the Belo Monte dam, construction companies handed over huge illegal payoffs disguised as campaign contributions to politicians in order to get them to approve the dam and deliver on lucrative building contracts. This has happened often elsewhere, despite evidence that the particular dams under consideration would prove problematic to local communities and the environment.“There are multiple barriers to moving towards more sustainable hydropower,” Moran told Mongabay. “One is the powerful lobbies [operated by the] construction companies who are addicted to building large hydropower because it is so financially rewarding for them. [Each new project] allows the lobbies to grow via opportunities for corruption [typically with] large amounts [of money going] undetected. Another [problem] is the collusion of people in government with the companies,” Moran explained. That complicity allows government to claim it is doing something important — providing energy for the public — even as officials profit from dam approvals while simultaneously disempowering the people who oppose the projects.A recent study using a database of 220 dam-related conflicts found that government and corporate use of repression, criminalization, violent targeting of activists, and assassinations were commonly associated with controversial dam projects. Frequently, the targets of violence are community organizers and indigenous leaders.The world’s largest waterfall by volume, Inga Falls, lies within the Democratic Republic of Congo, a country where 91 percent of the populace has no electricity. A massive hydropower project, the Grand Inga, is planned for this site, but instead of the $80 billion project bringing power to the people, electricity will be exported to South Africa to support large mining companies. This approach to electricity distribution is equally common in the Amazon, where this is a documented synergy between new dams and new mining concessions.Brazil’s Jirau dam on the Madeira River. Flooding in 2014, likely worsened by this dam and the Santo Antonio dam, helped create an international incident between Brazil, where the dams are both located, and Bolivia upstream, where the catastrophic flooding occurred, displacing 11,000 people. Image courtesy of the International Hydropower Association.A way forward Ideally, companies and communities should work together to implement innovative and alternative energy technologies that do not require disruptive dams or resettlements of people and riverine settlements. One solution is to move toward the placement of far more “micro-hydro” or “zero-head” projects, which utilize smaller instream turbine technologies and much diminished reservoirs.“Large hydro often bypasses isolated communities. Small hydro, like instream technologies, is designed to be located near people who are off the grid,” Moran told mongabay.com. “We need more off the grid solutions, whether solar, wind, biomass, or hydro, and the grid should be diversified and not over-rely on one source for its energy. And it should plan for climate change, and thereby reduce vulnerability. [Government] ministries who lead on energy need to serve the citizens and not only respond to the needs of industry, large urban areas or mining demand.”Importantly, when a mega-dam is in the planning stages, there needs to be government and corporate transparency, along with the implementation of rigorous criteria for holding large hydropower interests accountable before they can go forward. In such cases, the researchers recommend the following:Allow environmental impact assessments (EIAs) and social impact assessments (SIAs) enough power to prevent a dangerous dam from being built.Be sure EIAs and SIAs are conducted by third parties or firms who are serving the citizens and not employed or influenced by the dam company.Organize and implement better governance surrounding dams.Increase transparency so that true financial, social, cultural, and environmental costs of dams are communicated to the public.Carry sustainability measures from the design phase through to the build phase, including designs that follow seasonal river flow and allow fish pass-through, maintaining aquatic connectivity.Hydropower has accounted for the majority (71 percent) of renewable energy produced globally since 2016. Moving forward, hydropower could continue to hold an important place among other diversified alternative energy sources. But government and companies must do so without endangering the very ecosystems, great rivers, and people which host new dams. That is, the recent research shows, a cost too great for society and nature to bear.Citation:Moran EF, Lopez MC, Moore N, et al (2018) Sustainable hydropower in the 21st century. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 115:11891–11898. doi: 10.1073/PNAS.1809426115Banner Image: The Tucurui dam spillway. Courtesy of International Rivers.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more